International Journal of Keratoconus and Ectatic Corneal Diseases

Register      Login

VOLUME 2 , ISSUE 2 ( May-August, 2013 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Quality of Vision with Spectacles, Special Silicone Hydrogel and Gas Permeable Contact Lenses in Keratoconic Patients

Jose M González-Méijome, Sofia Claudia Peixoto-de-Matos, Antonio Queiros, Jorge M Jorge, Alberto Diaz-Rey

Citation Information : González-Méijome JM, Peixoto-de-Matos SC, Queiros A, Jorge JM, Diaz-Rey A. Quality of Vision with Spectacles, Special Silicone Hydrogel and Gas Permeable Contact Lenses in Keratoconic Patients. Int J Kerat Ect Cor Dis 2013; 2 (2):56-59.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10025-1051

Published Online: 00-08-2013

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2013; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate optical quality and visual function in keratoconus patients corrected with RGP contact lenses and a novel special design of silicone hydrogel contact lens.

Materials and methods

Twelve eyes of six patients with keratoconus were enrolled to experience a new soft contact lens (Soft-K) for keratoconus made of a silicone-hydrogel material and the outcomes were compared to the performance with gas permeable lenses and spectacles. The three situations were compared for monocular and binocular high (100%) and low contrast (10%) ETDRS LogMAR visual acuity and contrast sensitivity function (CSF).

Results

On average, there was an improvement of more than two lines in visual acuity over spectacle correction and this is statistically significant for both gas permeable (GP) and Soft-K lens (p < 0.001). Visual acuity was not significantly different between GP and Soft-K lens for high contrast acuity but was slightly higher with GP lens for low contrast under binocular conditions. Monocular CSF showed a marked improvement with the Soft-K lens and GP, compared to spectacles correction, particularly for medium and high frequencies; conversely.

Conclusion

Soft-K silicone hydrogel soft contact lens produces a clinical and statistically significant improvement in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity function over spectacle correction.

How to cite this article

González-Méijome JM, Peixoto-de- Matos SC, Queiros A, Jorge JM, Diaz-Rey A. Quality of Vision with Spectacles, Special Silicone Hydrogel and Gas Permeable Contact Lenses in Keratoconic Patients. Int J Kerat Ect Cor Dis 2013;2(2):56-59.


PDF Share
  1. Keratoconus. Surv Ophthalmol 1998;42:297-319.
  2. Keratoconus: a review. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2010;33:157-166.
  3. Contact lens fitting in keratoconus. CLAO J 1989;15:282-289.
  4. Use of contact lenses for management of keratoconus. Ophthalmol Clin North Am 2003;16:383-394.
  5. Visual performance and comfort with the Rose K lens for keratoconus. Optom Vis Sci 2002;79:493-501.
  6. Rigid contact lens fitting relationships in keratoconus. Collaborative longitudinal evaluation of keratoconus (CLEK) Study Group. Optom Vis Sci 1999;76:692-699.
  7. Oxygen transmissibility of piggyback systems with conventional soft and silicone hydrogel contact lenses. Cornea 2006;25:214-219.
  8. Soft contact lenses for keratoconus: case report. Eye Contact Lens 2006;32:143-147.
  9. Kerasoft IC compared to Rose-K in the management of corneal ectasias. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2012;35:175-179.
  10. Corneal scarring and vision in keratoconus: a baseline report from the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study. Cornea 2000;19:804-812.
  11. Factors associated with corneal scarring in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study. Cornea 2000;19:501-507.
  12. Estimation of the incidence and factors predictive of corneal scarring in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Keratoconus (CLEK) Study. Cornea 2006;25:16-25.
  13. Highresolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography technology for the visualization of contact lens to cornea relationships. Cornea 2010;29:1359-1367.
  14. ‘In situ’ corneal and contact lens thickness changes with highresolution optical coherence tomography. Cornea 2012;31:633-638.
  15. Limitations of the ocular wavefront correction with contact lenses. Vision Res 2009;49:1729-1737.
  16. Applying wavefront sensors and corneal topography to keratoconus. Biomed Sci Instrum 2002;38:471-476.
  17. Simulated optical performance of custom wavefront soft contact lenses for keratoconus. Optom Vis Sci 2003;80:637-643.
  18. On-eye performance of custom wavefront-guided soft contact lenses in a habitual soft lens-wearing keratoconic patient. J Refract Surg 2007;23:960-964.
  19. Correcting anterior corneal aberration and variability of lens movements in keratoconic eyes with back-surface customized soft contact lenses. Opt Lett 2007;32:3203-3205.
PDF Share

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) LTD.