International Journal of Keratoconus and Ectatic Corneal Diseases

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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 1 ( January-April, 2012 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Long-term Follow-up of Pachymetric and Topographic Alterations after Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus

Paraskevi G Zotta, Diamantis D Almaliotis, George D Kymionis, Vasilios F Diakonis, Kostas A Moschou, Vasileios E Karampatakis

Citation Information : Zotta PG, Almaliotis DD, Kymionis GD, Diakonis VF, Moschou KA, Karampatakis VE. Long-term Follow-up of Pachymetric and Topographic Alterations after Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus. Int J Kerat Ect Cor Dis 2012; 1 (1):22-25.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10025-1004

Published Online: 00-04-2012

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2012; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Purpose

To determine the long-term alterations of corneal thickness, along with topographic outcomes, after corneal collagen cross-linking treatment (CXL) for keratoconus.

Materials and methods

In this retrospective case series, 46 patients (52 eyes), 32 males and 14 females, with progressive keratoconus were included. All eyes underwent CXL in accordance with the standard protocol (Dresden) for the treatment of their ectatic corneal disorder between January 2006 and June 2007. Pachymetric and topographic outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months postoperatively.

Results

Mean follow-up was 28.08 ± 8.39 months (range, from 12 to 36 months). A statistically significant decline in corneal pachymetric values (at the thinnest location) when compared with preoperative values (467.65 ± 41.08 µm) was demonstrated at 1 (437.63 ± 50.57 µm), 3 (439.08 ± 52.27 µm), 6 (449.37 ± 52.73 µm), 12 (449.63 ± 83.53 µm) and 24 (459.97 ± 47.32 µm) months after CXL (p < 0.05, for all mentioned time intervals). Return to preoperative pachymetric values (469.52 ± 40.52 µm) was revealed 36 months post-CXL (p > 0.05). With respect to topographic (flat and steep keratometric values, keratoconus index), no statistically significant differences between preoperative and all postoperative intervals were found (p > 0.05, for all values for all time intervals).

Conclusion

Corneal pachymetric values reduce significantly up to 24 months after CXL treatment, while a return to preoperative values was revealed 36 months after the procedure. No significant changes’ concerning topographic outcomes was demonstrated after CXL, indicating stability of these parameters.

How to cite this article

Zotta PG, Almaliotis DD, Kymionis GD, Diakonis VF, Moschou KA, Karampatakis VE. Long-term Follow-up of Pachymetric and Topographic Alterations after Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus. Int J Keratoco Ectatic Corneal Dis 2012;1(1):22-25.


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